Metabolic Liver Disease: What You Need to Know

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Metabolic liver disease is a broad term that encompasses several liver conditions. Various things can cause these conditions, but they all have one thing in common: they cause the liver to function improperly. As a result, the body cannot metabolize fat properly, which can lead to several health problems.

What Causes Metabolic Liver Disease?
Several different things can cause metabolic liver disease. The most common cause is obesity; as much as 80% of people affected by this condition are obese. Other risk factors include type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol, and high triglycerides. Alcohol abuse is another leading cause of metabolic liver disease.

What are the Symptoms of Metabolic Liver Disease?
The symptoms of metabolic liver disease can vary depending on the underlying condition. In general, the most common symptoms include fatigue, weakness, weight loss, and abdominal pain. If the condition progresses, it can lead to more serious symptoms like jaundice, ascites (fluid buildup in the abdomen), and even hepatic encephalopathy (a condition that causes neurological problems due to liver damage).

How is Metabolic Liver Disease Treated?
The treatment for the metabolic liver disease will vary depending on the underlying condition. However, some general treatments can help manage the symptoms and improve liver function. These treatments include weight loss (if you are obese), exercise, a healthy diet, and avoiding alcohol. In some cases, medications may also be necessary to control cholesterol or blood sugar levels. More aggressive treatment options like a transplant may be necessary if the condition progresses.

Metabolic liver disease is a broad term that encompasses different conditions affecting the liver. Various things can cause these conditions, but they all have one thing in common: they cause the liver to function improperly. As a result, the body cannot metabolize fat properly, which can lead to several health problems. If you think you may be at risk for metabolic liver disease, talk to your doctor about steps you can take to prevent or treat the condition.