The Different Levels of Care in a Nursing Home

Avatar for Antony Turbeville
Antony Turbeville Antony Turbeville

Have you or a loved one ever considered moving into a nursing home? If so, you may have heard of the different care levels offered by nursing homes. In this blog post, we’ll take a closer look at the three main levels of care in a nursing home: skilled nursing, intermediate care, and long-term care.

Skilled Nursing Care
Skilled nursing care is the highest level of care a nursing home can provide. It is typically reserved for people who need around-the-clock medical supervision and nursing care. This could be because they are recovering from a hospital stay, have complex medical needs, or need ongoing physical, speech, or occupational therapy. Skilled nursing care is called “rehabilitative” or “transitional” care.

Intermediate Care
Intermediate care is the second level of care offered in a nursing home. It is typically for people who do not need constant medical supervision but cannot be safely cared for at home. Intermediate care includes help dressing, bathing, using the bathroom, and getting around. People in intermediate care also usually receive physical or occupational therapy.

Long-Term Care
Long-term care is the third and final level of care offered in a nursing home. It is for people who cannot safely be cared for at home and does not need constant medical supervision. Long-term care includes help with activities of daily living (ADLs), like eating, dressing, bathing, using the bathroom, and getting around. People in long-term care may also receive some type of therapy, but it is typically less intense than what is offered to people in intermediate care.

Nursing homes offer different levels of care depending on the needs of their residents. The three main levels of care are skilled nursing, intermediate care, and long-term care. Skilled nursing is the highest level of care and is typically for people who need around-the-clock medical supervision. Intermediate care is for people who do not need constant medical supervision but cannot be safely cared for at home. Long-term care is for people who cannot safely be cared for at home and do not need constant medical supervision.